British Politics’s Blog

The ravings of an individual, UK voter frustrated with our politicians

Posts Tagged ‘electoral reform

David Cameron’s Amnesty for wrongdoers

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Am I the only one that believes that Cameron is actually weak, not strong on wayward MP’s? Yes, he has told us how he is taking a strong line, but does the evidence back that up? I think not. If you are in the shadow cabinet, according to Cameron, it is sufficient to pay back anything that may not be considered “reasonable” and all will be forgiven. If you are a backbencher, then you may be referred to Cameron’s “kangaroo court”, if you have been a good boy or girl, but a little greedy, then you may be asked to pay some money back, but you will be exonerated. On the other hand, if you are a bit of a maverick, then Cameron will use this as an opportunity to get rid of you. At least that is my take on it.

So, are we to believe that tough man Cameron is going to tell all burglars and car thieves that so long as they return their ill-gotten gains, then they will be forgiven and can get on with their lives? Is it possible that Cameron’s so called tough approach is a bit of a misnomer, designed to deflect attention. A cynic might suggest that by telling everyone that he is a bit of a tough guy, he has successfully diverted attention and at the same time, ensured that it is not the court of public opinion that decides on whether an MP has misbehaved, but the court of David Cameron.

Sorry to all those that like Cameron, but I just don’t trust him, the more I see him in action, the more he gives off the air of an opportunist. I have noticed that whilst he says a lot, if you dissect what he has said, it is rarely tangible of even measurable. I really want to believe that Cameron and the Conservatives are a worthy alternative to the discredited Brown, but if I am honest, there is little that he had done or said that impresses. I think it will just be more of the same. I recognise that because I so want Brown gone, I am almost prepared to accept that the devil himself could do a better job…..but, I said almost! No matter how much we may want to have this country put back on track, we cannot just will someone to succeed, they first of all have to have the wherewithal to make it happen, and I do not see that in Cameron.

Also, where has all the talk of reform gone? Cameron is pushing Brown into an early general election, great, but not before we have had some electoral refirm. What is the point of being able to put in a new government if we are obliged to accept the people put before us by the party machine? That is not democracy. It means that our choice is limited to our preferred party, not candidate. If Cameron wants the people to support an early election, then he must allow the people to select their preferred candidate at the next election, not afterwards. We all know that when party’s win power they seem to forget about everything that said to get them there.

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Is David Cameron all mouth and no trousers?

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This is a rhetorical question, but also one I have been asking myself over the past few months given, in my opinion, he is trying to be all things to all men (and women).

Take for example his ‘commitment’ to give “serious consideration” to electoral reform. What type of commitment is “serious consideration”, it means absolutely nothing. Does he suppose that we all so stupid, so punch drunk and so desperate that we cannot tell the difference between a promise to provide serious consideration and one where he promises to deliver on a specific pledge? Cameron worries me, because he is all smiles, says plenty but offers little, yet what we need more than anything is a leader with conviction. In many ways, he reminds me of a post version of Tony Blair and look where that lead us?

Cameron said he would allow the people to select who their Conservative candidate for MP would be through “open primaries“. However, he then went on to state that this would only be where MP’s have stood down. Why stop there, if he is so certain that his party has selected the best candidates, why won’t he allow the local constituents to give their verdict? There are currently 190 Conservative MP’s, if Cameron wants to pass the power to the people, then he must insist that they all stand for re-selection. That would be people power.

On the use of Party Whips, Cameron has undertaken to look at this, that is not the same as making a firm commitment. Why not commit to a programme where Conservative MP’s are only required to toe the party line on manifesto commitments? That will reduce the power of the Executive and we have all seen what happens when the Executive gets too much power, just review the past 12 years. New Labour have introduced more laws in 12 years than all previous governments combined. Most of these laws have sought only to reduce our right to privacy, attack our liberty, and pass immense powers to quangos, the police and unelected officials.

He has suggested that MPs would could be handed the power of deciding the timetabling of bills and backbenchers would get powers to choose the chairmen and members of select committees. Great, so why not make it a firm commitment?

There is some merit in Cameron’s proposal of fixed term parliaments, but is this talk or a commitment? Why stop at parliament, what about MP’s having fixed terms, after all, there is an experienced civil service, so what is wrong with bringing in ‘new blood’? Why hasn’t David Cameron cottoned on to the fact that people power must allow the constituents to recall an MP if he or she fails to perform? Surely that is people power at its best? And what of reducing the number of MP’s by 10%? If the intention is to make the Executive more accountable to parliament, unless there are fewer ministers, this could have the opposite effect.

If Cameron is so tough on Conservative MP’s, why have none of them been deselected? How can he claim that Kirkbride’s case is any different to Mackay’s, are they not married? Are we supposed to assume that they never discussed the second home allowance arrangement? Why has he limited ‘questionable behaviour’ to paying back the excess, that is weak, not strong. As I stated before, does David Cameron truly believe we are all so stupid?

I have studied David Cameron over the past few months because I wanted to believe him. But, in my opinion, he still lacks any firm or meaningful commitments, on policy or reform. He comes across as charming, but he rarely, if ever makes a firm commitment on anything. He talks tough, but then acts like a wimp. He is a good speaker and very charming, but so was Tony Blair. I am beginning to believe that the Conservative Party under David Cameron will just be more of the same and if that is the case, he cannot count on my vote! – We need a return to conviction politics and soon.

Boycott the mainstream parties

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I have often advocated to friends and colleagues that the best way to deliver a hard-hitting message to politicians is to vote for fringe parties rather than mainstream. The reality is, at least for the most part, leaders of the main parties take our votes for granted. They know that there is a hardcore of supporters, but it is floating voters that really decide results, so that is who they target with populist policies. The thing that they fear most, is something that upsets the status quo, that is, the voters responding in an unpredictable or uncontrolledable way. Whether we like it or not, most voters are predictable, the mainstream parties like that.

This is perhaps why Lord Tebbit urged disaffected voters to “teach the big parties a lesson” by endorsing one of the smaller parties. Now this has been admitted by a former Conservative Party Chairman, perhaps my friends and colleagues will start to realise that a vote for a fringe party is not a wasted vote. As a fellow blogger stated in a recent post; “Politicians of all parties would do well to listen. They rule by consent, not as a right. The public could scupper all of their plans by simply voting for fringe parties, it may not give us a joined up government, but lets be honest, we haven’t had one of those for generations!”. There is no need to vote for extremist parties, in the EU Election there are quite a number of choices, including, but not necessarily limited to; UKIP, the Greens, the English Democrats, the Christian Peoples Alliance, NO2EU, Libertas, and the Jury Team.

Truth be told, MEP’s have very little power, so using the European elections to deliver a message to our domestic politicans carries very little risk and a great deal of upside. I know that I may be criticised for this comment, but the real power in the European Union lies with the unelected Commissioners, not the MEP’s. Our domestic MP’s have disappointed us, many have either abused or stood by whilst others abused an expense system that was actually designed to be abused….by the abusers! Ironic isn’t it! – Clearly our MP’swere quite prepared to treat the very people that elected them with contempt, but why not, they only needed us once every 5 years?

I dislike being taken for granted, both in terms of my goodwill and my vote and I am sure many people will feel as I do. So maybe we should all consider delivering a very explicit message to the mainstream parties, that we cannot, nor will we be taken for granted. And, if they don’t start to listen following the June 4th results, then there is a very real possibility that people power will ensure that the vast majority of current MP’s will lose their seats at the next election and I mean from all parties. If existing MP’s are unwilling to listen, especially those from New Labour, then I will consider standing as an independent MP and I will urge others to follow suit. If there are enough independent MP’s, the people of this country may actually regain their voice, because massive majorities will be replaced by the need to gain a consensus. Authoritarian rule will be replaced by a democratic process. Now that would be nice.

I am happy to be accused of being naive. But I will say this, MP’s abused their expenses because we let them, we assumed that they could be trusted to self-regulate. We have accepted an electoral system that favours the larger parties, a system that provides these party’s with massive majorities, even if they get just 35% of the vote, in turn we get what amounts to single party rule. The ruling party, as evidenced by the New Labour Party Machine, want ever more state power and control over the people. New Labour, for example, has become completely disengaged and out of touch with the people, they have introduced a raft of  new laws, well over 3,500 in 12 years, many removing long-held rights to privacy and liberty and the New Labour delivery has become authoritarian, not inclusive. 

If we have to vote for fringe parties, or independent candidates to deliver a harsh lesson to our self-serving MP’s and political parties, then I am up for it. I want to return to a democratic process where our views are taken into consideration, not one where we are controlled or spied on; I want our government to be truly representative and, above all, I want to feel proud of our democracy, our politicians and our government….and I am sure many people would agree with those sentiments, so lets take the “necessary action” to repeat the overused phrase by our illustrious leader…and “do what’s right” to use another!