British Politics’s Blog

The ravings of an individual, UK voter frustrated with our politicians

Posts Tagged ‘high street banks

Do not bank on the banks

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My attention was turned to an interesting post over at Power to the People which followed on from my own post in respect of a bankers claim that “banks are not charities“. The post that I am referring to relates to corporation tax that banks would normally pay and comes at the whole issue from a perspective I had not considered, but is, nonetheless, very relevant in the current economic climate.

As everyone knows, the high street banks are posting massive losses as they move to write-off questionable assets and large consumer debts. However, under the current HMRC rules, they are entitled to carry over losses to offset against profits in future years. This means, that in spite of the significant risks being borne by the UK taxpayer as a direct consequence of the banking bailout, when things improve, there will be no win for us. In other words, the big banks, will not have to pay any form of corporation tax for some considerable time to come, perhaps, in some cases, for the next 5 years.

This, whilst perfectly legal, is an outrageous state of affairs and in my view, must be treated as an exception to the rule. Gordon Brown must bring in urgent new legislation to prevent the banks carrying forward these massive losses to set off against future profits. The principle of carrying forward losses is a good one, however, in this particular instance, it would leave the taxpayer with a very sour taste indeed. Failing which, the government must advise the banks that they could be subject to a windfall tax equivalent to any loss to the Exchequer in terms of tax revenues. The full article can be read here: Will taxpayers lose out to the banks again?

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UK banks are not charities

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A senior figure at one of the major UK banks was quoted on Channel 4 News as saying that “banks are not charities“, needless to say this coward was not willing to have his name revealed. But what hypocrites these banks are, they claim that they are not charities, yet they clearly think that the UK tax payers are, after all, only a few weeks ago, they had to come begging for our help.

It is well known that high street banks are the most loathed businesses on the high street and their leaders and managers are, for the most part, considered with the same disdain as politicians. But, what arrogance they demonstrate, these people (high street bankers) made the decisions that ended up with their banks having to come begging for help, they made it easy for people to borrow, they were the architects of their own demise. Now they seek to lecture the government and issue a veiled threat to the very people that have risked their money to protect the interests, jobs and shareholders of the high street banks. They are pathetic, blood sucking creeps, that do not deserve their vast salaries and positions. How dare they lecture us, fair weather friends indeed. I hope this idiot has the courage to ‘own’ his statement, rather than hide in that cowardly way, only politicians and bankers know so well.

I stated in my post yesterday that the public should, when practicable, vote with their feet and punish these bankers by withdrawing funds and cancelling our current accounts and credit cards with all of the banks that so clearly look upon us as the necessary evil, rather than respect.

I also appreciate that many people will not, at this time, be in a position to punish the banks by withdrawing their business. But I do believe, when we are, that we must deliver a hard-hitting message to the banks that have turned their backs on the very people that came to their aid. The banks cannot survive without customers, fact. Every 10 years or so, they go through a phase of telling us they don’t want current account business and shortly afterwards, they realise that they do and go on a recruitment drive. We should all let them know what we think of them for turning their backs on us. Full article

In the meantime, the government should consider their position carefully, the public will not appreciate our money being risked by banks that have little or no regard for the well being of their saviours and their customers.

UK banks continue a path of self-interest

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I was pleasantly surprised when the Bank of England announced that there was to be a further reduction of 1.5% in interest rates, dropping to 3%. After all, most of the economists arguedthat the banking bailout would not work, unless or until there was a “substantial” reduction in interest rates. So, eventually, the Bank of England reacted positively, even if they could have gone further.

So what have the main UK banks done? The answer, little or nothing. With the odd exception, the Cheltenham & Gloucester and the Bank of Ireland for example, none has announced a reduction in the rates they charge their customers, claiming only that the matter was under review. Now I know that the LIBOR rate is supposed to be an influencing factor,  but if the banks were to pass on the 1.5%, surely they would be neutral.

The whole point of the Bank of England reducing the interest rates, was to provide the economy with a well needed shot in the arm, but if the high street lenders do not reduce their rates accordingly, it will be a largely meaningless initiative. I have read a few blogs and a number are calling for some form of positive action by banking and mortgage customers, but for the most part, it seems to be creating nothing of a stir. My own view is that that banks have received massive support from the UK tax payers and many of these people are also their customers.

Therefore, I believe the banks have a moral obligation to offer their support by passing on the rate reductions in full, at the earliest opportunity. Prevarication should not be an option. Banks were careless in their past lending practices and therefore they have to shoulder some of the responsibility for the situation many borrowers find themselves in. Not all, but some. high street lenders and mortgage companies could help themselves (in the long run) and their customers in the short-term by recognising the fact that the economy and many of their customers need and probably deserve an economic stimulus as would be provided by a rate cut.

One website has suggested a boycott of banks that do not pass on the rate cut, especially those that have received tax payer funded state aid. I agree. I also appreciate that many people will not, at this time, be in a position to punish the banks by withdrawing their business. But I do believe, when we are, that we must deliver a hard-hitting message to the banks that have turned their backs on the very people that came to their aid. The banks cannot survive without customers, fact. Every 10 years or so, they go through a phase of telling us they don’t want current account business and shortly afterwards, they realise that they do and go on a recruitment drive. We should all let them know what we think of them for turning their backs on us.

I earnestly hope that fellow bloggers out there will post more on this issue and try, together, to pressurise the high street banks into action and encourage a backlash if they don’t act positively. I am also disappointed, that the government did not include some form of pre-condition, that state aided banks should pass on any interest rate cuts. It is not as if the UK government were not aware that 1. interest rate cuts were inevitable, 2. banks would try and profit from cuts and 3. there would be a public backlash against the government if state aided banks were to shaft their customers.