British Politics’s Blog

The ravings of an individual, UK voter frustrated with our politicians

Posts Tagged ‘tories

Cameron: Overseas aid is taxpayers money not yours!

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David Cameron is wrong to insist that the £9 billion ‘overseas aid budget’ should be “ring fenced”. At a time when the people of this country are facing great hardship, it is foolhardy to believe that he will have widespread support for delivering UK taxpayers money to countries such as Pakistan and China.

Notwithstanding the huge amount of taxpayers’ money that is being committed in our name, we all know that a good deal of this money is squandered, you only have to look at some of the brand new 4×4 vehicles that are driven my Government officials in some African countries, while their people starve. More often than not, these vehicles are paid with using foreign aid; this is hardly a success story. Furthermore, whilst some of these countries can rely on foreign aid, they are not being encouraged to stand on their own two feet.

Everyone has to tighten their belts at times such as these and our Government should be no different. I full accept that investment in health and education must be maintained, although I would qualify that statement by insisting that there should be a root and branch review to ensure that we are receiving value for money. However, overseas aid is an area that can and should be cut, at least until this country is back on its feet…because like it or not, our finances are in a precarious position.

Cameron keeps telling us how we will all have to accept a period of “austerity”, which will include increased direct and indirect taxes. Okay, I accept that this is inevitable, but how dare he foist new taxes on the British people before he has taken a scalpel to expenditure on items such as overseas aid? Cameron needs to remember that there are many people in this country that live in squalor, often council owned high rise flats that are not maintained or are well past their sell by date. These people are forgotten, whilst huge sums are given away overseas.

How many times have we heard the ‘youths’ of today tell us that the reason there is so much petty crime and a gang culture is because they are “bored” and they have “nowhere to go”? Yet, youth and community centres are routinely closed down due to lack of funds…the result is that youngsters are left roaming the streets. As a consequence, people within the community are scared, they have to suffer petty crime and their quality of life is dramatically reduced. The priorities of this Government and for all intents and purposes, the next Government’s, are completely at odds with what is needed and wanted by the people of this country.

It is high time all politicians started to listen to the people of this country and not simply pay lip service. We are all tired of people at the top telling us what we want and what need, rather than listening to us!

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Cameron sets up Economic Recovery Group

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The latest announcement from the Tory Party machine is that David Cameron is to invite “leading businessmen” to join his ‘Economic Recovery Group’. now, don’t get me wrong, this is a laudable initiative, but it lacks a certain something, specifically its failure to appoint people from the SME sector, even though they are undoubtedly the backbone of our economy.

The UK’s 4.4m small and medium-sized businesses (SMEs) are the engine room of our economy, accounting for 47% UK employment (13.5m), 99.7 per cent of all enterprises and 48.7% of UK Plc turnover. Within the SME sector, some 4.2m actually employ less than 10 employees and a further 167,000 less than 50. In fact, SME’s actually employ 60% of the ‘private sector’ workforce. It is, therefore, self-evident that small business is the primary vehicle for innovation which leads to new jobs, new industries and new wealth for this country and its people.

The people Cameron has invited include Next’s Simon Wolfson, Lloyds TSB chairman Sir Brian Pitman, Google chief executive Eric Schmidt and ex-Vodafone boss Sir Chrisopher Gent.  Quality people, but what do these guys know about small and medium sized enterprises. Granted, they may have once worked within one or two, but you can be certain that it was a very long time ago. If Cameron wants to come up with sensible initiatives that have a positive impact on the vast majority of businesses in this country, then he needs to stop trying to hit the headlines with industry ‘names’ and start talking to real business people within the SME sector. It may not give him the same headlines, but it will provide him with a better insight into the real issues and there is a chance that the people of this country will start to think he is a man of substance rather than glitz. We have all, I am sure, had enough of glitz, polish and rhetoric to last a lifetime.

Don’t get me wrong, I don’t doubt the credentials and standing of these men, but I do question the logic of inviting these ‘wise men’ to offer advice on how to deliver real solutions to the SME sector. Unless, of course, Cameron doesn’t realise what contribution the SME sector makes towards UK Plc turnover and how many the sector employs. Don’t go for an industry spokesman Mr Cameron, invite a couple of SME businessmen. If Mr Cameron doesn’t know where to look, as a SME businessman myself, I will gladly give my two-penneth and my time, at no charge.

Labour MP, Caroline Flint shows the way forward

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I have long felt that Caroline Flint is one of the more intelligent members of the Labour cabinet, not that this would be particularly difficult, but she certainly shines above the rest. In a fringe meeting at the Labour Conference, she once again demonstrated that she has a better idea of where Labour needs to be, than it’s current leadership.

She said “We have to govern for the 80% of ordinary people who work hard, whether they have a minimum wage or whether they have a degree. The majority of people who work hard, take the ups and downs, pay their taxes and support their kids and ask for very little from the state deserve the attention of our government.”

She is completely right! Caroline Flint argues that middle income earners feel a strong sense of unfairness demonstrated by the policies of this government. She also fundamentally disagrees with the notion pur forward by think tank, Compass, which suggests that Labour must concentrate on the poorest people in order to win the next general election. Right again Caroline.

What this government has failed to grasp is, that it is primarily the middle income earners that fund this government’s projects through higher taxes and the payment of surcharges, for example, the £35 a year levied by the energy companies for their energy saving measures offered to the poorest members of our community. So, whilst the middle income earners are paying for the governments pet projects, they earn too much to benefit from tax credits and other ‘benefits’, but too little to be able to shrug off the rising prices. They are the forgotten majority and any government that ignores them, does so at their peril.

For too long, this government has battered middle income earners, with higher direct taxation, introducing measures to push them into the 40% tax bracket, green taxes, the list goes on. Then they are told that they don’t qualify for most, if any of the measures they have paid for. It is appalling, and it has taken Caroline Flint to point this out, even David Cameron’s conservative party and Nick Cleggs LibDems have failed to highlight this indifference and victimisation. As for Gordon Brown, how can any middle income earners believe his fairer society speech?

Let us hope that Gordon Brown listens to Caroline Flint, or better still, given the Labour party is going to lose the next election, the opposition parties could take up the mantle and offer to redress the balance. I am not an analyst, but I would guess that many of the moderate income earners are in fact what would be termed ‘floating voters’. Our politician’s should start to listen more, if not to the public, then Caroline Flint.

OECD UK Recession Warning and the future for MPs

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The OECD have now confirmed what everyone else in the UK could ‘feel’, but our own government was keen to deny, that the UK is about to enter a recession. Darling and Brown simply had to know the truth and it is unforgivable that they could not be straight with the electorate, many of whom, entrusted New Labour with the future of our economy. That abuse of trust is shameful.

Instead of worrying about our economic situation, all Gordon Brown seems to be concerned with is his future as leader, instead of worrying about the people of this country, all New Labour seem to be concerned with is whether they can retain their seats. They are all spending so much time looking inward, for self-interest, that they are ignoring what is happening in the outside world, or more specifically, in the UK.

Contrary to Gordon Brown’s assertions, the UK’s fundamentals are not strong, in fact, it takes the highly respected OECD to tell us that the UK is in trouble. However, not only is the UK economy predicted to shrink in the next two quarters, but the UK is also the only economy not expected to see a recovery this year. The OECD said that Britain would fare worst amongst the Group of Seven leading economies. This is in spite of the assurances from Gordon Brown who has regularly claimed that the UK is the best performer among the G7, which includes Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan and the United States. The OECD expects the UK to grow by 1.4% in 2009, against the government forecasts of 2.5%. Okay this government has missed most of it’s previous growth targets, not something they brag about, but in the current climate, wishful thinking is not appropriate. There is also a prediction of some 200,000 people being added to the jobless total, which is already at a record high when you consdier that thatere are estimated to be some 2.5m on some form of long term disability.

The OECD have even given some of the reasons behind our weak position, most noteably that the Government’s policy of spend and borrow has left this country ill-equipped to deal with this economic slump. Interesting, that the average man in the street could see this wasn’t sustainable, but our elected officials could not, or perhaps, would not. The truth is Gordon Brown, as chancellor, borrowed in a boom, leaving us with the largest budget deficit of any industrial economy. Now we are all going to have to pay the price.

Aside from the fact that New Labour, as guardians of our economy, should have been able to predict much (not all) of what is happening and tightened their fiscal belts, what is most disappointing is the other parties. The opposition parties are keen to criticise, but if they want to show that they are fit for government, then they should tell us what they would do. It doesn’t matter if New Labour steal their ideas, it is the well-being of our country that matters and the electorate will know who came up with the answers and demonstrated true leadership skills when we needed them most.

David Cameron and the conservative party are running scared, they are shouting from the sidelines, rather than getting stuck in. In other words, they are basking in the failures of this government, they are gloating, but, above all they are failing to demonstrate that they could do any better. There is no time like the present, for Cameron and the conservative party to show their mettle, air their policies, demonstrate their competence for government and show leadership under pressure. If Cameron cannot see that this is his chance, then he does not deserve the highest office in this country. If he continues to say nothing of any value or substance, then we are entitled to believe that he doesn’t know what to do and therefore, he and his party would be no better.

New Labour in general and Gordon Brown in particular have lost all credibility in terms of economic confidence and they have long lost the integrity that is essential to govern long term. This is not helped by the fact that they have patently denied any personal, or policy culpability, electing to blame everything on other factors such as the credit crunch and oil prices. We know that it had as much to do with this governments policy of spend, tax, borrow and spend, leaving nothing in the kitty for a boom period. 

Cameron on the other hand is demonstrating a lack of courage, an absence of policies or ideas, poor judgement in a time of trouble and little depth or gravitas. Charm and fancy words simply do not wash at a time like this. Cameron and the conservative party are so worried about getting it wrong, they have been paralysed with fear. We expect far, far more from the conservative party, which in the past has invariably been the principal bastions for economic competence, but under the leadership of Cameron, they seem to lack bottle, confidence and spirit.

In fact, if we look around, never has this country been so poorly served by its members of parliament. Most of our MP’s are more interested in playing up to the cameras and preening their feathers with statements to, and interviews with, the press, the editors of which, in turn, attempt to set the policy agenda and influence public opinion. Never before have we all felt so removed from our politician’s, who don’t talk like us, act like or or think like us. Our whole electoral system needs a good shake up, no longer should we be represented by career politicians who have rarely held down a proper job, no longer should we be represented by union activists who, however they may try and convince you otherwise, have little in common with the public. We need a system where real people, those with life experiences, families, mortgages, business experience and integrity, can be elected to represent us. In other words, people that look like us, act like us and speak like us.

All too often, as our elected MP’s enter parliament, they immediately go native. Corrupted by power, position and prestige. They forget why they were put there and start to believe that they are ‘different’ from the rest of us. For the most part, our MP’s are just good salespeople, yet once they are put to the test, they appear superficial. What we need is depth, all parties, but particularly the conservatives, should be selecting their candidates based not on gender or race, but whether or not they can make a contribution to society, to government. Not based on whether or not they went to school with them, but based on life experience, how grounded they are and whether they are likely to be seduced by membership of this exclusive club called parliament.

The British people are no longer as politically naive as they were in the past. The Internet means that they can communicate more easily with like minded people, no matter where they reside in the UK. They are more vocal than they have been in the past and they have more information at their fingertips than they have had in past decades. By comparison, parliament is firmly rooted in the past, it is crusty, old fashioned and inward looking. Newly elected members should be looking to modernise parliament, not simply fall in line, they should be looking to use their time in office to pass more control back to the people, rather than entrenching their grand and priveledged positions, by gaining more and yet more state control. Most importantly of all, they should be listening to their trustees, the people that elected them. Placing the electorates’ interest’s first, before their own and before that of the party.

This recession is likely to be different to previous ones. Not because of the suddenness, not because of the depth, or the expected duration, not because our government has lied to us about our true economic position. But because, this time, there is a very real risk that the groundswell of public opinion will not only impact on the government, but also on the lacklustre opposition, and the weak ‘other’ parties. If people have time on their hands due to lack of employment, an easy method of communicating with like-minded people and a desire to see change, we could well see another, formidable political party formed, this time with real people, who have genuine feel for what needs to be done, the energy and the desire to be part of this change and above all, new ideas and a commitment to follow them though.

Political parties take note, members of parliament take note, the public have had enough of micromanagement, of state control, of tax and spend government, of mortgaging our future through uncontrolled borrowing, of manipulating the figures to make things look better than they actually are, of being treated like fools, of lies, of ever rising taxes and above all, of you! In this time of need, we still have an overseas aid budget of £5bn, yes, £5bn, when there is a very real prospect that some of our pensioners will have to choose between heating and eating to use that over used, but insightful term. Where are our priorities?

Opposition parties take note, you need to stop gloating while the people of this country are suffering, you need to stop looking so weak, when we need strength, you need to demonstrate the courage of your convictions, to show us what you would do to make things better. You need to show your true colours (if you haven’t already). Above all you need to lead by example, be confident and at the same time remain grounded and in touch with the people that matter.

Imagine what would happen if the people of this country decided to vote, not for the principle 3 parties, but independents? If we have nothing to lose, this could happen. Yes it would be chaos, but it could be a precursor to a new political force, one that included the voters, rather than career politicians, then the boot would be on the other foot. Just 650 people rule 65m people, this is by consent, not as an automatic right. Our colonial past demonstrates only too clearly what happens when so called leaders consistently let down the people, when they are removed, remote or aloof from the mood of the public and when our leaders start to think they are better than everyone else.

In the UK is will not be a military coup, it won’t be a work to rule, it will be through the ballot box. Once the public recognise that it is possible to make a stand, buy choosing not to elect anyone from the main three political parties, then there will have to be change. When we, your trustees, have little to lose, expect the unexpected. Members of Parliament, you have been warned!

 

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